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Jul 24, 2015
Carol

For his role in King Arthur, former Sons of Anarchy star Charlie Hunnam gets the chance to wield the legendary sword, Excalibur, while kicking ass and delivering a “harder edge” to the king’s tale. And though it’s not the first time the actor has handled a pretty epic piece of weaponry, the movie gave him an opportunity to show off a few unique tricks he’d picked up in the past.

During EW’s cover shoot, the future King Arthur opened up about the Samurai sword he has at home, which his Sons of Anarchy costar Ryan Hurst coveted. So, when the series wrapped, the cast gifted Hurst with a Samurai sword of his own, but rather than put it on display, the blade was used for a very special purpose – trimming off Hurst’s beard.

Source: ew.com

Jul 23, 2015
Carol

Check out the exclusive video of Charlie’s cover shoot and interview with Entertainment Weekly where he gets candid about working with Guy Ritchie and gets clumsy with his sword.

Jul 23, 2015
Carol

Check out the extremely handsome cover issue for the July 31st issue of Entertainment Weekly of Charlie as they give us an exclusive first look at Charlie from Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur which just wrapped filming this month. Who’s excited?! 😀

May 18, 2015
Carol

You can check out Tom’s entire interview over at Collider.com

crimson-peak-tom-hiddleston When Benedict Cumberbatch dropped out, Guillermo sent the script to you and he said that you turned around almost immediately and accepted, I think he said within 72 hours.
HIDDLESTON:
Yeah.

Was it based on him, or was it based on the script, or was it based on – What was it that made you say, ‘This is definitely a part worth taking’?
HIDDLESTON:
Well, it happened very quickly. He called me, my agents called and said, ‘Guillermo Del Toro is going to call you in the next hour’ and he called me and told me the story and he said, ‘Don’t say yes, or no. But I’m gonna rewrite the script this weekend or tonight or tomorrow, and I’m gonna send you a new draft’ and like an hour later Jessica [Chastain] called me and said, ‘You have to do it’ [Laughs] ‘I want you to do it, and Guillermo wants you to do it’ and I was really excited I couldn’t wait to read the script. Then, it must have been like a day later, I got it and I read it immediately in one sitting and he had rewritten the role, so I got sort of my own draft, he had rewritten the part for me in a way. It’s just brilliant, it just is a brilliant screenplay, and I wanted to work with him, I knew that Jessica, and Mia [Wasikowska], and Charlie [Hunnam] were locked in and on board; and I love Mia and I know Jessica from before and I wanted to work with Charlie so there was just no possible way I was going to say ‘no’. Working with Guillermo who I’ve admired for so long, and the script itself was just brilliant, the screenplay was captivating and rich and sophisticated and terrifying; and the role was amazing, and different than anything else I’d done, It was a very, very quick ‘yes’ after that.

Guillermo showed us some stills from the film and we saw the color scheme that Mario Bava, Hammer Films, bright Technicolor color scheme. Does that sort of aesthetic play into the performance as well, is there some level of bigness to it or are you guys playing smaller in that brighter, colorful space?

HIDDLESTON: Yeah, I didn’t think about the color too much in my approach, even though Kate Hawley’s sort of mood boards, the costume designer, she put together these extraordinary mood boards which covered her entire office with different headlines so it would be these massive posters of imitism, for Sharpe it might be Caspar David Friedrich’s painting Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, or depictions of Byron, or old kind of early, early prints of these long-haired Victorian engineers standing on hill tops, which seem like a cliché but it’s true. And then stuff about the mines, so all these pictures of boys who’d just crawled out the mines or people being washed after they’ve been down the mines for weeks; all those mood boards are plastered around the side of my trailer because the images themselves are so inspiring. Just the way people look, the way people dress, the way people carry themselves, the way people sat and stood, faces and haircuts. I did a lot of that just thinking about the visual sort of thing, but not necessarily color even though I knew that there’s this very dark midnight blue or something that we always have for the Sharpes, that Lucille and Thomas should have black hair.

We wanted Thomas to look like this Byronic hero, to be the tall, dark stranger in the new world, Charlie Hunnam is blonde and Mia is blonde and these two dark strangers from the north of England come along and they’re sophisticated and old and European and they should bring with them the era of gothic romance. I read some stuff, Guillermo pointed me towards The Mysteries of Udolpho which is this sort of early gothic romantic classic by Ann Radcliff, and The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole, we talked about Rochester in Jane Eyre, even Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice; these figures, these wealthy gentlemen with big houses who possibly become emblems of English privilege that everyone’s talking about. Who is that man in the corner with the dark hair and the intense stare? The interest of that mystery, that there are gentlemen with dark secrets was something that was very compelling at the time.

May 8, 2015
Carol

Congratulations to Charlie on his nomination! Be sure to tune in to the A&E Network on Sunday, May 31st (at 8:00pm ET/5:00pm PT) to see if Charlie wins!

BEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
• Aden Young – Rectify (Sundance)
• Bob Odenkirk – Better Call Saul (AMC)
• Charlie Hunnam – Sons of Anarchy (FX)
• Freddie Highmore – Bates Motel (A&E)
• Matthew Rhys – The Americans (FX)
• Timothy Olyphant – Justified (FX)

Apr 10, 2015
Carol

Today, April 10th marks Charlie’s 35th birthday. In light of that fact I would like to wish Charlie a fantastic birthday. HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CHARLIE!!! Xo

Mar 12, 2015
Carol

Though he’s more than 6,000 kilometres away, when Charlie Hunnam calls from his hotel room in Milan after Calvin Klein’s fall/winter 2015 men’s show, it feels like we’re slinging beers at a bar around the corner. Already boasting an impressive resumé and praise-worthy performances on the big and small screens (Sons of Anarchy, Pacific Rim and Queer as Folk), the Newcastle, U.K., native chats with ELLE Man about throwing scissors, character deaths and getting in fighting shape.

What’s it like to go from playing Sons of Anarchy’s Jax Teller to your latest role as King Arthur? That’s a pretty intense character transformation.
“It was important for me to have a little bit of time to try to find some sort of centre before I jumped into a different character. It was actually really painful to say goodbye to Jax. I immediately stopped riding my motorbike. I know I’ll start riding again at some point, but I needed to get away from it all, just so I could find myself again.”

So you had to create some space between you and Jax in order to grieve?
“Having to say goodbye to that character was really heartbreaking for me. I have lost friends and family members before, and that feeling of bereavement—although this wasn’t as intense—it was that same feeling. I held it in my heart for about a month after filming ended. I said a lot of silent goodbyes to Jax, but ultimately there was no room left for him in my life, so I had to let him go.”

Masculinity is a significant theme in Sons of Anarchy. What do you think it means to be a man today?
“It means standing on your own two feet, living by your code of honour and being a rock for the people around you. But in the modern context, it also means being in touch with your feminine side. Men have to be strong enough not to repress their emotions; real strength allows for vulnerability.”

What’s the most rebellious thing you have ever done in your life? (Or at least what you’ll admit to publicly.)
“When I was 15, I was banned from going to Florence on an art-history trip by a teacher who generally thought I was a ‘menace to society.’ While he was away, I broke into his stash of acrylic paints and painted this giant crushed-up Coke can. It was maybe the best painting I’d ever done, but he ripped it up in front of the whole class. I was so angry and humiliated and sad that this thing that I loved and that I’d created was destroyed. I felt myself starting to cry, which was totally un­acceptable to me at that time. We used to twist old art scissors into throwing stars, and I could hit a fucking bull’s eye, no problem. So I threw some of these scissors at him, and they landed in the doorframe parallel to his head. And that was it—they expelled me from school.”

Some people might say that doing onscreen nudity takes a certain rebellious attitude. And judging from your CV, you’ve certainly become comfortable with showing some skin onscreen—your current shirtless CK Reveal campaign included.
“The level of nudity that I do now, which is taking my shirt off, doesn’t bother me at all. But I have done full frontal before. I did full frontal when I was 18 on the TV show Queer as Folk. But because I was playing a 15-year-old character, the censorship people wouldn’t allow us to put it on TV.”

Would you be willing to do that now, almost 20 years later?
“I think when I was young, I was a little bit more fearless with that stuff. I don’t know…I’m sure I would; I have nothing to hide.”

Do you switch up your training routine when you’re getting physically ready for a role?
“I tend to do whatever I think is appropriate for the character. You’re playing the character, so go do what that character does—it’s going to bring you closer to him. For Arthur, he’s a great fighter, so I’m going to be fighting in the gym. And when I’m between jobs, I need to work out a lot for my sanity. If I weren’t an actor, I’d be the fittest motherfucker on the block.”

Source: ellecanada.com

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